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Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Article. Mostrar todas las entradas

viernes, 12 de marzo de 2021

How do medications affect your oral health?

Oral Medicine

Perhaps not everyone knows it, but drugs can also affect oral health, so it is important that they are prescribed by a health professional. Self-medication can influence general and oral health.

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The dentist must know the adverse reactions that some medications present, in order to identify them and recommend the appropriate treatment.

Enlaces Patrocinados


We share an article by Dr. Edward Harsini that presents the most common forms of affectation of some medications in the oral cavity.

Oral Medicine


👉READ FULL ARTICLE HERE👈


Souce: azbigmedia.com
Author: DR. EDWARD HARSINI

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jueves, 4 de marzo de 2021

How to Manage a Pediatric Patient with Oral Ulcers

Oral Medicine

Oral ulcers is a circumscribed lesion with a yellowish-white appearance and it is common to find this type of lesion in the oral cavity of a child. These ulcers can be present for different reasons, such as: due to an accident, or when immunity is compromised.

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The symptoms are diverse, it can appear: irritation, itching, even fever and general malaise. Treatment is necessary to prevent these injuries from causing greater discomfort to communicate and eat.

Enlaces Patrocinados


We share an interesting article on the management of oral ulcers in pediatric patients, where the symptoms and treatments that are required are discussed.

Oral Medicine


👉READ FULL ARTICLE HERE👈


Souce: https://jcda.ca/
Author: Eric T. Stoopler, DMD, FDS RCSEd; Ghada Al Zamel, DDS - J Can Dent Assoc 2014;80:e9

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miércoles, 3 de marzo de 2021

8 interesting facts about the Wisdom Tooth

Oral Surgery

The presence of the third molars causes great fear and discomfort to the patient. The wisdom tooth must be removed to prevent a series of consequences such as: food accumulation, pericoronitis, caries, inflammation of the gums, etc.

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Wisdom teeth generate a lot of anxiety and questions in the patient, and it is necessary for the professional to answer each of them in order to generate calm and confidence in the patient.

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We share an article that answers the most frequent questions that a patient asks before undergoing removal of wisdom teeth.

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👉READ FULL ARTICLE HERE👈


Souce : chippewavalleyfamily.org
Author : Dr. Kari Peper


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viernes, 14 de agosto de 2020

The Importance of Dental Health During Cancer Treatment

Oral Cancer

Cancer treatments are aggressive and bring a series of complications in other parts of the body, and the oral cavity is no exception. Before starting chemotherapies or radiotherapies, it is necessary to be evaluated by the dentist, to eliminate existing infections such as cavities and periodontal disease.

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Some of the complications that can occur during chemotherapies are: dry mouth, canker sores and ulcers, spontaneous bleeding from the gums, jaw pain, etc. All complications are preventable and, if they occur, are manageable.

Enlaces Patrocinados


Knowledge is our best prevention weapon, that's why we share an interesting article that explains in detail the complications that can occur during cancer treatment and how we can prevent it.

Oral Medicine


READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


Souce: capemaycountyherald.com / By Eric V. Thomas, DMD

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jueves, 13 de agosto de 2020

Bruxism: A medical or dental issue?

Bruxism

Bruxism is a parafunctional habit characterized by teeth grinding or clenching, usually at night. This activity generates a series of problems in the teeth, chewing muscles and jaw joint.

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Bruxism is often seen in the dental office and is listed as the “third most common form of sleep disorders after sleep talking and snoring.” This parafunctional habit (or parasomnia in medical terms) of grinding or gnashing the teeth and clenching the jaw has two different subdisorders—awake (diurnal) bruxism and sleep (nocturnal) bruxism—and is encompassed by a complex web of supposed causes and variables.

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Sleep bruxism (SB) exists in 8% to 31.4% of the population, while awake bruxism has a higher prevalence exhibited in 22.1% to 31% of the general population.

Unfortunately, both conditions have the same deleterious effects on the patient’s mouth and jaw, causing a cascade of destructive symptoms in the mouth, head, and neck. The parafunctional activities of bruxism cause hypersensitivity in teeth, headaches, painful muscles of the jaw and temporomandibular joint (TMJ), occlusal wear, and often, damage dental restorations, even dental implants.

Oral Medicine


Indeed, 13% of failed implants are attributed to bruxism, making recognition of the disorder essential before commencing implantation work.

Without question, bruxism is a constant symptom in the dental office, at least in its presenting symptoms. However, there is more to this complex and perplexing disorder than meets the eye, as any dental professional who has been in the field for more than a few years can tell you. Beyond the local effects, the syndrome is correlated with a host of other medical and lifestyle issues. This leads us to the question: Is bruxism a medical or dental issue?

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


Souce: https://www.rdhmag.com/pathology/oral-systemic/article/14169169/medical-problems-dental-solutions-bruxism-a-medical-or-dental-issue
Image: Vocal

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viernes, 26 de junio de 2020

Problems associated with dental implants

Dental Implants

While the dental implant procedure itself has a very high success rate, there is still a small percentage of patients who experience problems. Some of these problems are minor, and some are much more serious.

The success of a dental implant procedure is often related to:

1.- The dentist or surgeon’s skill
2.- The quality and quantity of the bone available in the patient
3.- The cleanliness of the materials used


4.- The patient’s healing ability
5.- The patient’s oral hygiene habits

The best way to reduce the complications of dental implant surgery is to only receive treatment from trusted, qualified, and competent dentists and oral surgeons. Also, the patient must practice excellent oral hygiene to avoid infection. Here is a list of some of the potential problems associated with dental implant surgery:

Infection

Infection in the surrounding bone and gums is probably the most common complication experienced by patients. Infection can happen as a result of a contaminated implant, a pre-existing infection, non-sterile techniques, or poor healing ability. Sometimes, infection occurs months or even years after the procedure.

Oral Medicine


Failed Osseointegration

Osseointegration is the firm anchoring of a dental implant into the bone around it. Sometimes the bone does not fuse around the threads of the implant, causing the implant to become uncomfortable, loose, or even come out completely.

This, however, is not a common problem, since the dentist or oral surgeon will usually x-ray the patient’s mouth before the procedure in order to determine which parts of the jawbone are dense enough to successfully hold the implant in place.

If osseointegration is unsuccessful the first time around, then the dental implant procedure can be attempted again later, once the patient has fully healed.

Damage to Surrounding Areas

Adjacent teeth, tissues, and nerves can sometimes be negatively affected by dental implant surgery, too. However, in most cases the dentist is able to identify potentially problematic areas by examining x-rays or CT scans. A proper surgical approach is then planned to find the ideal location and angle, minimizing the risk for complications.

But problems can still occur, even after all of the proper precautions are taken. For example, the jawbone can fracture when pressure is applied during the implant placement. Also, the sinus cavity can be perforated if the dental implant is placed improperly or if it is the incorrect length.

Another possible damage site is the nerve that runs through the lower jawbone. Sometime this nerve can be damaged during surgery, and other times the implant itself may be placed on top of the nerve, causing pain and numbness. If symptoms persist, then the implant will most likely need to be removed.

Post-Surgical Bleeding

A minor amount of blood is considered normal for the first day or two following the surgery. However, excessive bleeding or the appearance of blood after the initial two days is usually not normal. It’s best to contact your dentist immediately if this occurs.

Rejection by the Body

It is quite uncommon, but is still a possibility, that the body will consider the implant a harmful foreign object and will proceed to reject its presence in the mouth.

Fuente: www.cheerfuldentist.com


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viernes, 19 de junio de 2020

The causes and treatment of Dental Hypersensitivity

Dental Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity is more common than you might think, and is characterized as a sharp, stabbing pain of short duration and occurs when there are changes in temperature.

Tooth sensitivity has several causes, some of them can be: gum recession and enamel wear. The dentist must evaluate and find the causative agent to prevent the patient from suffering from this pathology again.



The dentist should make recommendations to the patient regarding the brushing technique and the type of toothbrush used by the patient. We share with the dental community an extensive and interesting article that tells us about dental hypersensitivity, its causes and treatments.

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Read the full article here


Souce: Dental Hypersensitivty - Dr. Anveeta Agarwal

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